NIH grants up to $28 million to group led by Scripps Research for work on ebola treatment

LA JOLLA, CA – March 20, 2014 – The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a five-year grant of up to $28 million to establish a new center for excellence to find an antibody “cocktail” to fight the deadly Ebola virus. The project, which involves researchers from 15 institutions, will be led by Erica Ollmann Saphire, professor at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI).

“It’s a global collaboration,” said Saphire. “Everyone in the field got on the same page to collaborate on a set of definitive experiments.”

Ebola virus causes an extremely virulent disease that leads to death in 25 to 90 percent of cases. Outbreaks of the fast-moving virus, which spreads via the blood or other bodily fluids of an infected person, have occurred in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo in recent years.

For decades, scientists thought no antibodies were effective against Ebola virus, but in 2012, research from the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases showed that a mix of antibodies can stop the virus. Other labs around the world were simultaneously testing other such antibody cocktails with success.

Today, a whole menu of antibodies have been identified as potentially therapeutic, and researchers are eager to figure out which combinations are most effective and why. Antibodies are currently thought to be the best strategy for treating rare and deadly viruses such as Ebola because they are effective even a couple of days after exposure, a time period during which a person could be airlifted to a hospital for treatment.

FOLLOW THE ORIGINAL EUREKALERT! POST HERE.

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